AGIP Gas Station

AGIP Gas Station

Back in the sixties AGIP was the most important Italian gas company. Its logo was the well known six-legged dog still used today by the company and the petrol was called Supercortemaggiore. Most of you probably remember the odd dog as Ferrari F1 sponsor back in the seventies and eighties.I remember as a child the delicious Agip station marked by modernist design and with that bizarre dog positioned everywhere. My build is a little AGIP gas station you could easily find along the state highway of my country back then. The building is marked out by rounded corner and glass walls. A sloped roof completes the period design.
On the left you can see a classic Italian light truck from the sixties, the OM Leoncino decked out in AGIP-Supercortemaggiore livery. A just fueled up Vespa completes this classic Italian scene. Don’t forget to take a look at the back side where old signs and used parts are lying all around.

Hot Dog Stand

Hot Dog Stand

The Hot Dog is probably one of the most famous and delicious street food all around and I love it, especially with mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise and sauerkraut. When Lego relaesed the Hot Dog man in the Series 13 Collectible Minifigures and then the Hot Dog vendor in Serie 17, I thought they were really cute and perfect for a street food themed MOC. And here it is my classic Hot Dog stand featuring many details both outside and inside the kiosk.

In December 2018 the HOT DOG STAND was selected by The Brothers Brick – probably the most popular LEGO blog around – and included on the shortlist for The Brothers Brick LEGO Creation of the Year 2018.

Bugatti Barn Find

Bugatti Barn Find

As a petrolhead I’ve always dreamed about finding a classic car hidden for years in an old barn or shed. And that is what is called “Barn find”. My latest build showcases two car-hunters discovering a classic Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix in a barn. Close to the blue machine you can see the old farmer with his dog showing the treasure, even if he doesn’t know its real value. And the french beauty looks really in shape.

The Bugatti Type 35 was the most successful of the Bugatti racing models, the famous “pur sang”. Introduced at the Grand Prix of Lyon on August 3, 1924 the Type 35 was phenomenally successful, winning over 1,000 races in its time. You can easily build your Bugatti Type 35 following the instructions below.
In November 2017 a 1925 model has been sold for over €1.4 million at the Artcurial auction in Paris.

The Takehito Yamato Coupé

The Takehito Yamato Coupé

I saw this classic Hot Rod on Chop & Roll magazine and I was stricken by the uncommon colour (PPG 1936 Cordoba Tan) and by the smooth design of this Deuce. Plus its story was really cool: built in California and shipped to Japan where its new owner lives.
Japan has a thriving hot rod scene, and many cars have been bought and shipped there. This coupe, however, is the first being built to order then making the trek across the Pacific.
Takehito Yamato contacted Walden Speed Shop, based in Pomona Ca., after seeing his works in The Rodder’s Journal.
Takehito wanted a traditional hot rod, and while that may be essentially what he ended up with, the details are what really sets this coupe apart.
Inspired by the Takehito Yamato history I built the tan Deuce with all the details you’d expect to see in a brick-built scale model.
To complete the work I built a brand-new show-room full of vintage stuff and a Minifig scaled tan Deuce.

Different backgrounds for the Takehito Yamato Coupè: from the iconic Route to the classici Speed Shop.

Esso Gas Station, W.M. Dudok (1953)

Esso Gas Station, W.M. Dudok (1953)

Put a tiger in your tank!

If you think about retro gas station you probably think about something really cool and stylish: modernist architecture, art deco gas pumps and other outstanding car stuff displayed outside the station.
You can find all this in the elegant gas station designed in 1953 by the Dutch architect Willem Marinus Dudok. Here made of LEGO bricks.
The design of Dudok was simple and brilliant simultaneously. According to the mission he received from ESSO Netherlands, the station had to be functional and inexpensive to produce. It was just after World War II and raw materials were scarce. At the same time the road network grew and pumping stations had to be placed anywhere.
112 Dudok Esso stations were placed along the Dutch highways.

My LEGO Dudok Esso gas station has the same features of the real one: an elegant design, a v-shaped roof on both sides, two gas pumps on a dark grey platform, different advertising signs and other stuff.
The shop is on the front of the station; a detailed service garage is located at the back (you probably find out something familiar with my previous garage and workshop). There are a lot of details both outside and inside the building, let’s take a look.
In the shop you can find a big desk with a vintage phone, a cash register and a architect lamp. A big clock is positioned on the wall close to the shelves where you can see the oil cans and an old radio. Two neon lights and a fan are hung on the ceiling support.
The garage at the back features a lot of utensils, advertising signs and other stuff. Take a look at the Michelin Man (Bibendum).

My VW Type 2 T1 decked up in Esso livery fits perfectly in this scene.
You can see the real Esso station looking at pictures below, photographed at the National Automobile Museum Collection Louwman (The Netherlands) where was placed in 2004.

Scooter Shop | Dream Garage

Scooter Shop | Dream Garage

Officina Super Sprint turns twenty in 2015 and to pay tribute for this important anniversary I built the LEGO model of the shop.
Officina Super Sprint is a Vespa specialized workshop. It was founded in 1995 by two friends, one of them is also an AFOL (Adult Fan Of LEGO) known as Norton74…yes, that’s me. This MOC is called “Dream Garage” and follows “Garage Life”, the oldtimer Volkswagen workshop I built and presented in 2014.

“Dream Garage” features many tools and details. Let’s take a look. A wooden workbench, with wrenches and vise, is positioned at the center of the workshop. On the left of the workbench is positioned the sandblaster. There’re two wide windows and two big sliding doors. Details are everywhere: checkered flags, advertising signs, trophies, extension cords and more…

There are also a mobile roller cabinet with four drawers, the air compressor (a little bit hidden, behind the right lift), the oxy-acetylene welder, the electric welder and the column drill press.
In the middle there are two hydraulic scissor lifts to easily work on the Vespas. Last but not least the Garage features three Vespas: two Vespa PX and one Vespa T5 (the one with the square front light).