2020: A YEAR IN REVIEW

2020: A YEAR IN REVIEW

As usual it’s time to look back and take stock of what has been done in the past twelve months. 2020 has finally passed and what a strange year it’s been for everyone.
Despite many personal issues I have had to face, I have built many creations I am particularly satisfied with: new colors, new shapes, new techniques, new stories, I must admit I built some of my favorite MOCs ever.
I had a lot of fun testing new part usages and also find out new piece on Bricklink. I used a lot of weird parts in my last few MOCs. Very funny!
2020 also marks an incredible goal to me: I reached 10.000 followers both on Instagram and Facebook, really unbelievable.
Thanks to all of you who follow me and support my work, it means a lot to me! Thanks to all the great builders out there who are a big source of inspiration. Also a big thank you to all the blogs and magazines that featured my works in 2020. Let’s take a look at 2020 builds here below.
All the best and happy building!

The snowy Magic Bus is The Brothers Brick cover photo for December 2020!

The snowy Magic Bus is The Brothers Brick cover photo for December 2020!

Few hours ago I had the pleasure to find out my snowy Magic Bus has been chosen by The Brothers Brick as the December photo cover for all Brothers Brick social media. A huge pleasure and honor for me, thanks once again TBB team!
The same happens 5 years ago when my Scooter Garage was chosen as the TBB cover photo for August 2015, few months ago when the yellow General Store was the Cover Photo for June 2020 and last month when the A-frame cabin, probably one of my most appreciated creations, was chosen once again as the TBB cover, this time for November. Three times in the same year, unbelievable but mind blowing!
Take a look at the four screenshot straight from The Brothers Brick website and read below the complete write-up by James Wiley (TBB Social Media Specialist).

“This month’s cover photo from Andrea Lattanzio takes us back to the wild. The Magic Bus we’ve been treated with before has now been treated with snow, which makes for a lovely winter scene. The bus remains familiar, but there have been some added details to give depth and texture to the snow. Additionally, trees that were once leaf-filled are now barren and covered with snow, the firs have been replaced with white branches, and the clever touch of icicles added to the bus windows complete the scene.
Be sure to visit Norton74’s flickr page for a bit of history on this bus that no longer resides in Alaska’s wilderness. It’s an interesting story that makes for a great scene.“

(“TBB Cover Photo for December 2020: Into the Wintery Wild” The Brothers Brick – December 12, 2020)

Stilt Houses building process

Stilt Houses building process

Let’s take a deep look at the building process of the bizarre Stilt Houses. Don’t miss the tons of NPUs (New Part Usage) and techniques I used, especially check out the weird pieces you can spot here and there. Have fun!
In order:
1) Building the first and tallest framework;
2) Preparing the 1st platform;
3) Adding the tan walls;
4) Completing the tiny house with the roof;
5) Assembling the framework with the 1st platform;
6) The 2nd framework is ready;
7) Platform No.2 ready;
8) Framework No.2 coupled with its platform;
9) The two structures are linked by a crumbling bridge;
10) A bunch of details to complete the diorama;
11) The brand new diorama is complete and ready for the photo shoot;
12) Click! Stilt Houses photo shoot!

Snowy Magic Bus: behind the scenes of the building process

Snowy Magic Bus: behind the scenes of the building process

Let’s take a look at some unreleased WIP snapshots of my latest creation straight from Alaska: the Magic Bus in the snow from Sean Penn 2007 “Into the Wild” movie. Follow the Snowy Magic Bus diorama step by step building stages, scroll through the images and find out the secrets of one of my beloved creations:
1) Building the base using plates and wedges;
2) Placing the bus, testing sizes and proportions;
3) Snowy pines complete the base;
4) Adding slopes and tiles on the roof as snow effect;
5) Ready for the photo shoot;
6) A sketch as starting point;
7) The real Bus in the Alaskan snow.
Enjoy!

A-Frame Cabin: behind the scenes of the building process

A-Frame Cabin: behind the scenes of the building process

Follow the A-Frame Cabin “step by step” building stages, scroll through the images and find out the techniques and the new part usage of one of my most popular creations. Below the building process stages:
1) A sketch as starting point;
2) Building the facade;
3) The facade is ready to be assembled to the base;
4) Base details;
5) Base + facade;
6) Adding the V-roof;
7) A bunch of details to complete the diorama;
8) The main characters of the scene;
9) Photo shoot;
10) Amazing drawing from my little son Pablo.

“FIRE TRUCK” designer Chuck Miller talks about his works and his career [Special interview for Norton74]

“FIRE TRUCK” designer Chuck Miller talks about his works and his career [Special interview for Norton74]

From the beginning I set myself the goal of bringing original and interesting content, high-level MOCs and top notch photos to my fans. Everything written, built and photographed by myself.
That’s why today I submit you an exclusive interview with an american car designer father of the Fire Truck, the radical Show Rod I built few years ago via LEGO bricks.
His name is Chuck Miller and his nephew, Eric Miller, is a LEGO fan and he follows my FB page. When Eric spotted the brick-built Fire Truck he got in touch with me and he showed the model to his uncle who was really impressed. I was honoured for that and I had the chance to make few questions to Mr. Miller about his career and his famous vehicles.
Miller founded Styline Customs in Detroit in the late 1960s, specialized in building custom and concept cars designed to attract attention and win awards. One of his major successes came at the 1968 Detroit Autorama, where he won the prestigious Ridler Award with the “Fire Truck”. 

You can read the full interview below: ladies and gentlemen starts your engine!

Hi Mr. Chuck Miller and thanks for accepting to have a chat with me. Just few questions about you and your creations.

N74: When your interest in cars and Show Rods started and why?
CM: It started when I was 10 or 11. I would draw in my school books while in class. When I was in high school I was a hall monitor and would sit and draw in a note book the whole time.

N74: Can you tell me a little bit about your background? I mean, are you a self-made car designer or did you study design or something like that?
CM: I have no formal designer education. I bought the body shop I worked at through high school when I was 20 years old. So my education started at an early age. Here the kind of schooling I have is called the “school of hard knocks”.

N74: In a few words, if possible, tell me which are your career milestones.
CM: One of my biggest mile stones were winning the Don Ridler memorial award for the Fire Truck in 1968. There are many more but this is the biggest.

N74: As you know I built the replica of your famous Fire Truck; can you tell me where the inspiration to build it come from and when?
CM: The idea was one that I have had for some time. In 1966 I started working with John Bogosian making some drawings. We would go back and forth with ideas and drawings until I made the final decision.

N74: Did it satisfy your expectations? Did it win any awards? Any curiosities about the Fire Truck?
CM: As with all projects there are always little things you wish you would have done differently. But I was very satisfied with the final outcome. The biggest award was the “Ridler” but there were many others. The curiosities are the fire extinguisher is the gas tank, the first aid kit is the battery cover, and my favorite is the top of the gear shifter is a handle from Miller Beer tap.

N74: Which are your favourite creations?
CM: This is like trying to pick your favorite child…

N74: Have you been influenced by other car designer? If yes, which ones?
CM: I paid close attention to many other builders such as George Barris, the Alexander brothers, Bill Hines, Gene Winfield, and Darryl Starbird.

N74: Are you working on something new or are you just enjoyng your time?
CM: Last year I made a clone of my 1969 Red Baron hot rod that Tom Daniel designed. This year I am working on remaking the set of Zingers I built in the 70’s. Now I work on something when and if I like.

N74: Recently I built the “Paddy Wagon” designed by Tom Daniel. The Fire Truck and the Paddy Wagon look having the same source of inspiration. Is this correct? Have you ever known Tom Daniel?
CM: I did not know Tom Daniel when I was working out the design. I have meet Tom one time in California in 1969 after I built the Red Baron.

Many thanks for your time Mr Chuck Miller, it has been an honour chatting with you and I’m sure LEGO fans will appreciate the interview.
Keep up the good work!

More info about Chuck MIller’s works: chuckmillerstyline.com