From sketch to model: behind the scenes of the Sweet Tooth building process

From sketch to model: behind the scenes of the Sweet Tooth building process

Even for my latest creations, the Sweet Tooth cabin from Netflix TV series, I took the work in progress photos, or rather the steps to assemble the parts of which the diorama is made up of.

While you can take a look at the photos below to check out the assembly steps, clicking here you can read the full and detailed article about the Gus’ shelter. Have fun!

1) the base of the entire MOC made of many dark tan wedge plates;
2) the two shacks ready to be placed on the left side of the diorama;
3) first coupling done;
4) with these 3 cabins the house is going to be complete;
5) the Gus shelter is complete and you can recognize the setting of the Netflix series;
6) Pubba, Gus and his alleged mother;
7) adding the last details;
8) with the trees the MOC is ready for the photo shoot;
9) click! Photos are ready to be published on my social media page.

Sweet Tooth Cabin

Sweet Tooth Cabin

I recently saw the Netflix TV series Sweet Tooth (an American fantasy drama streaming television series developed by Jim Mickle based on the comic book of the same name by Jeff Lemire) and, although I’m not a big fan of the TV series, the first episode gave me a brilliant idea to build a new cabin in the woods.
Here is the shelter of Gus, the half-deer “hybrid” child main character of the series, and of Pubba, his alleged father.
As you know in recent years I have built many shacks and this one joins the previous ones, enriching the series.

The diorama has a structure I have used in many other past creations: a base of dark tan wedge plates on which the central core of the creation stands and in the background some trees and shrubs that frame the scene. The build consists of 5 small shacks that can be joined together to create the shelter of Gus and Pubba. In addition to the usual “warm” colors such as reddish brown, dark tan and the classic dark bluish gray, I used a color that I had never used before: medium azure, as it appears in a part of the house in some scenes of the series.

In the central part you can easily recognize the octagonal window that marks Gus’s house in the woods. I built the window using the useful tile, modified facet 2 x 2 Corner with cut corner. The part on the far left has a circular shape that I built by creating an octagon. It is the first time that I have built a circular shape and I’m satisfied with the outcome. I recreated a kind of rise for the shack using 6X6 light bluish gray tiles, a piece that I have used extensively in the past for all my garages.

As always I have tried to include many details and if possible NPU. Among the strangest parts I like to remember the bearskin rug from Duplo series placed on the roof as a cover. I had already used this element in my Stilt Houses and I am sure that I will find other MOCs where it can be inserted in the future. On the ground to the left you can spot a dark tan leg of an unidentified creature that simulates a large boulder on the ground. On the right the arm of a maxi-fig, specifically Cull Obsidian, also represents a boulder (I have used this piece before).

To recreate Gus, a half-deer “hybrid” child and main character of the series, I used the hair of the Faun from the Collectible Minifigure Series 15. From behind you can see the ears and a hint of horns, just like when Gus was growing up. Pubba, on the other hand, looks like a “hiker” with a large backpack full of objects and tools useful for survival in the woods. On the right a deer shyly appears, Gus thinks it’s his mother, if you’ve seen the series you know what I’m talking about.
There are many other interesting details and parts, check them out and have fun spotting them here and there.

Magda’s Garden Shed: behind the scenes of the building process

Magda’s Garden Shed: behind the scenes of the building process

Let’s take a look at some unreleased WIP snapshots of my latest creation straight from the countryside. Follow Magda’s Garden Shed “step by step” building stages, scroll through the images and find out the secrets of my latest flowering diorama.
In the middle of the scene is the actual garden shed which has the classic American barn shape (does it remind you of anything?) and a warm color combination: reddish brown for the roof and eaves, combined with the tan of the walls and the dark tan of the doors. The entrance steps are medium nougat.
The large tree that sprouts up from the roof immediately catches the eye, and it’s the leading feature of the entire scene. The outdoor flooring is made with many light bluish gray slopes of different sizes, among which I have inserted white tiles to give the idea of porphyry. The effect is very pleasant.
All around there are many plants, flowers, and a couple of saplings (one on the left in the foreground and the yellow one in the background). On the right, you can spot the scarecrow made with different types of bars and with the head and hat of the collectible Scarecrow Minifigure, one of my favorites.
The Swirling Rocks element on the left, coming from the Sandman Minifigure, is used as a vase holder, I think it’s a NPU (Nice Part Usage). A flower holder made with a fishnet hangs from the side wall, and close to it is a plant set in a Scala and Belville series Flowerpot. I have already used that element in my Winter Garden.
There are also two wheelbarrows in the scene: a red one leaning against the wall near the pumpkins, and another in the foreground on the right. The latter is made with different LEGO pieces. Can you guess which ones they are?
On the top of the façade there is a porthole made like the ones in my previous Blue Cottage. On the left, you can see a compass that represents a sort of sundial. There is also a nice little roof over the door made with many slightly raised 2X1 tiles.

Below the step by step pictures, in order:
1) The flowering diorama and me;
2) A beautiful photo of the shed with a natural background;
3) Preparing the base made with many dark tan plates and plate wedges, the flooring is made with many light bluish gray slopes of different sizes, among which I have inserted white tiles to give the idea of ​​porphyry;
4) The facade is ready, only a bunch of details are missing;
5) Coupling the base and the main building;
6) Adding the details on the left side;
7) Plants and utensils added on the right side and the eaves made with many slightly raised 2X1 tiles;
8) The two-piece roof is made with reddish brown plates and tiles;
9) With the roof on top the shed is almost complete;
10) The Garden Shed is complete and ready for the photo shoot!

The inspiration behind the Garden Shed came from a drawing by a Japanese dioramist, Mr. Yasuhiro Okugawa, who I really appreciate. Take a look below at the coloring process of the original black&white drawing.

Magda’s Garden Shed (or the Shed with the Tree)

Magda’s Garden Shed (or the Shed with the Tree)

Every time I visit a garden shop I am fascinated by the mixture of colors and shapes of the plants that you can find there. I really like that atmosphere especially in the ancient shacks.

I tried to recreate that kind of location by building a barn-shaped shed surrounded by flowers and plants. The inspiration came from a drawing by a Japanese dioramist that I really appreciate.
The large tree that sprout up from the roof catches the eye and it’s the leading element of the entire scene.
The garden shed is the kingdom of Mrs. Magda (can you spot her?), a friendly Spanish lady who has retired to countryside with her plants and flowers.

The diorama is full of details and strange pieces, have fun finding them. In the next few days I’ll share more “behind the scenes” pictures, so if you want to know more, stay tuned!

“When driving through the countryside, it’s a common sight to see a dilapidated barn in the distance, where nature has taken over. But it is much less common to see nature intruding on a well cared for building. Take this lovely shed by Andrea Lattanzio, for example. While it is clear that the roof has seen better days, the landscape and the exterior of this garden shed clearly receive a lot of love and attention from Magda, the owner. Almost every landscape detail is noteworthy, but my favorite unique part is the Minifig base for Sandman from the Marvel Spider-man franchise, used as a base for the pot to the left of the shed doors.“

(Say Magda, there’s a tree in your shed  The Brothers Brick – July 1, 2021)

Classic Sports Car | Instructions and part list

Classic Sports Car | Instructions and part list

Build your own Classic Sports Car
This white/black classic sports car was featured in my “‘Americana Barn Find diorama” and in my “Mustang Hard Top at the shop” both from 2018. I recently I enjoyed taking “step by step” instructions pictures.
Scroll through the images below to find out the plans to build this classic sports car decked out in a simple but effective livery. You can also discover the cute sports car in the dioramas as so youn can take inspiration to build your own scene.
Generating this kind of instructions is a very time-consuming activity and you probably could make instructions faster using one of the many SW available. But the outcome of photo instructions is something unique and in my humble opinion it’s a little bit artistic too. That’s why I spent a lot of time taking pictures and preparing the “step by step” instructions.
Enjoy!