Stilt Houses: how to live 30 feet in the air!

Stilt Houses: how to live 30 feet in the air!

Partially inspired by the films of the masterful animation filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki – I’m not actually referring to a particular film but rather its unique style and atmospheres – my latest creation features two weird guys living 30 feet in the air in minimal but cozy stilt houses.
The starting point for this work was the tent on the right stilt house, a very strange and forgotten element from a mid-2000s Indiana Jones set.
At first I was thinking of a single pile dwelling then I added the second on the left joined by a crumbling bridge. And gradually I inserted various details and elements, some of which are really bizarre like the bearskinrug on the roof of the house on the left.
Unavoidable the off-road vehicle ready to deal with mud and rough terrain and complete with all the necessary tools to fix it yourself in case. It is based on my previous Chevrolet Blazer spotted in the Sheriff Hopper’s Cabin diorama built in 2019.
There are many other details and strange pieces, have fun finding them and if you have any questions write them below in the comments!

Into the Wild and the Magic Bus under the snow

Into the Wild and the Magic Bus under the snow

A few months ago I built the most iconic scene from the movie “Into the Wild”, directed by Sean Penn in 2007, with the Magic Bus standing in plain sight in the wild Alaskan woods. It was early spring.
With the cold season coming it was taken for granted I’d be tempted to build the snow capped Bus as it appears in some scenes of the movie.
The sand green/white Bus stands now on a big snowy base built with many weird parts to create the snow-covered foliage effect. White pines are placed behind it.
Chris McCandless’s story is well known and sadly it didn’t end well.
And the Bus itself, seen as a danger, has been recently airlifted from the Alaskan wild to a secure site after two hikers have died and at least 15 have had to be rescued while trying to reach the bus in the remote Alaskan wilderness.
Abandoned on the Stampede Trail near Denali National Park, the bus had become a pilgrimage site. It was revered by travelers around the world who had read the book or seen the movie. But it had also become a hazard, luring hikers into forbidding territory.

Click here to take a look at my first version of the “Into the Wild” diorama with more info about the story of Chris.

A-Frame Cabin: behind the scenes of the building process

A-Frame Cabin: behind the scenes of the building process

Follow the A-Frame Cabin “step by step” building stages, scroll through the images and find out the techniques and the new part usage of one of my most popular creations. Below the building process stages:
1) A sketch as starting point;
2) Building the facade;
3) The facade is ready to be assembled to the base;
4) Base details;
5) Base + facade;
6) Adding the V-roof;
7) A bunch of details to complete the diorama;
8) The main characters of the scene;
9) Photo shoot;
10) Amazing drawing from my little son Pablo.

A-Frame Cabin

A-Frame Cabin

An architectural icon from 1950 to about 1975, the A-frame is one of my favourite rural homes ever, a triangle-design built for lounging on outdoor decks and staring at nature.
I built this cabin inspired, in part, by Harlan Hubbard‘s book Payne Hollow, about living a simpler life in a hand-built home. The author is considered by many a modern-day Thoreau.

“Two brothers, Dan and Ethan, burned out on modern working believed that stripping away modern comforts and living more simply in nature would lead to a more spiritually an creatively fulfilling life. They looked for a cabin in the woods and finally found out this old wooden A-Frame Cabin. They fixed up it and now they live there happily.”

It’s not my first cabin in the woods but it was very funny building the A-structure and trying to add many weird details. I also played with the light to let the scene as deep as possible.

“We are mid-way through October, and autumn, as well as spooky season, is in full effect, Andrea Lattanzio’s cozy LEGO A-Frame home located amongst some beautiful fall-colored conifers is the perfect build to capture the moment we are in. The key to the main architectural build here is definitely in the tiling – we’ve got plenty of tiling on the roof, tiling for the deck, and more tiling to cover the house’s base structure. Printed tiles also help render the lumber packed away in the left, maybe for firewood. I love Lattanzio’s use of tree limb elements arranged in such a way to create pointed evergreen trees – different colors are also utilized for that autumn color-changing aesthetic. Perhaps the most interesting example of parts used in this work would be the hammer minifigure utensil which is applied in multiples to compose the foundation of the home. Many small details in this build are eye-catching, including the broken stairs leading up to this shack-like a-frame dwelling. Even if some home-improvement is needed on this little getaway house, it still looks like a great place to escape to on an autumn weekend.“

(A-Frame Bringing the Autumn A-Game  The Brothers Brick – October 18, 2020)

Winter Garden

Winter Garden

This Moc was on my wishlist since a long time. My goal was to recreate a welcoming room full of plants and flowers while using many pieces from the Scala, Fabuland and Belville series.
I have been collecting these kind of pieces in the past few months, and have finally placed them in my Winter Garden.
If you look carefully you’ll notice many Scala pieces like the award ribbon, the watering cans, the cloth rug, the chairs, the wicker baskets and the suitcase. The coffee-table legs are linked via the Scala towel bar, a piece I had never heard of, but very interesting. I also added a couple of Fabuland utensils: the camera and the jerry can on the cabinet.
There are many plants and flowers and I used different kind of utensils to create the plants supports (hockey sticks for the cactus, brooms for the ficus).
It was very funny building it and it’s something different from my usual “comfort zone”. Hope you like it!

Joe’s Tow Truck

Joe’s Tow Truck

A couple of weeks ago I posted the Joe’s Cottage straight from the woods. The little diorama featured also the Joe’s Tow Truck and It was time to show it alone in plain sight.
I used the same frame of my previous pick-up trucks but with a completely different rear-side and some new adds, like the front hooks and other new details. The back crane is made of different kind of bars and it looks well-proportioned. As often happens I found the 2X4 decorated tile in my stocks by chance and it fits perfectly on the back.
Joe is really proud of his little truck. And me too.