A-Frame Cabin: behind the scenes of the building process

A-Frame Cabin: behind the scenes of the building process

Follow the A-Frame Cabin “step by step” building stages, scroll through the images and find out the techniques and the new part usage of one of my most popular creations. Below the building process stages:
1) A sketch as starting point;
2) Building the facade;
3) The facade is ready to be assembled to the base;
4) Base details;
5) Base + facade;
6) Adding the V-roof;
7) A bunch of details to complete the diorama;
8) The main characters of the scene;
9) Photo shoot;
10) Amazing drawing from my little son Pablo.

A-Frame Cabin

A-Frame Cabin

An architectural icon from 1950 to about 1975, the A-frame is one of my favourite rural homes ever, a triangle-design built for lounging on outdoor decks and staring at nature.
I built this cabin inspired, in part, by Harlan Hubbard‘s book Payne Hollow, about living a simpler life in a hand-built home. The author is considered by many a modern-day Thoreau.

“Two brothers, Dan and Ethan, burned out on modern working believed that stripping away modern comforts and living more simply in nature would lead to a more spiritually an creatively fulfilling life. They looked for a cabin in the woods and finally found out this old wooden A-Frame Cabin. They fixed up it and now they live there happily.”

It’s not my first cabin in the woods but it was very funny building the A-structure and trying to add many weird details. I also played with the light to let the scene as deep as possible.

“We are mid-way through October, and autumn, as well as spooky season, is in full effect, Andrea Lattanzio’s cozy LEGO A-Frame home located amongst some beautiful fall-colored conifers is the perfect build to capture the moment we are in. The key to the main architectural build here is definitely in the tiling – we’ve got plenty of tiling on the roof, tiling for the deck, and more tiling to cover the house’s base structure. Printed tiles also help render the lumber packed away in the left, maybe for firewood. I love Lattanzio’s use of tree limb elements arranged in such a way to create pointed evergreen trees – different colors are also utilized for that autumn color-changing aesthetic. Perhaps the most interesting example of parts used in this work would be the hammer minifigure utensil which is applied in multiples to compose the foundation of the home. Many small details in this build are eye-catching, including the broken stairs leading up to this shack-like a-frame dwelling. Even if some home-improvement is needed on this little getaway house, it still looks like a great place to escape to on an autumn weekend.“

(A-Frame Bringing the Autumn A-Game  The Brothers Brick – October 18, 2020)

Winter Garden

Winter Garden

This Moc was on my wishlist since a long time. My goal was to recreate a welcoming room full of plants and flowers while using many pieces from the Scala, Fabuland and Belville series.
I have been collecting these kind of pieces in the past few months, and have finally placed them in my Winter Garden.
If you look carefully you’ll notice many Scala pieces like the award ribbon, the watering cans, the cloth rug, the chairs, the wicker baskets and the suitcase. The coffee-table legs are linked via the Scala towel bar, a piece I had never heard of, but very interesting. I also added a couple of Fabuland utensils: the camera and the jerry can on the cabinet.
There are many plants and flowers and I used different kind of utensils to create the plants supports (hockey sticks for the cactus, brooms for the ficus).
It was very funny building it and it’s something different from my usual “comfort zone”. Hope you like it!

Joe’s Tow Truck

Joe’s Tow Truck

A couple of weeks ago I posted the Joe’s Cottage straight from the woods. The little diorama featured also the Joe’s Tow Truck and It was time to show it alone in plain sight.
I used the same frame of my previous pick-up trucks but with a completely different rear-side and some new adds, like the front hooks and other new details. The back crane is made of different kind of bars and it looks well-proportioned. As often happens I found the 2X4 decorated tile in my stocks by chance and it fits perfectly on the back.
Joe is really proud of his little truck. And me too.

Joe’s cottage

Joe’s cottage

Joe is a lonely guy. He lives in his tan wooden cottage somewhere in the woods. His mates are birds and chickens. He loves driving his tow truck and he always helps people who are in breakdown on their way.
My latest creation was inspired by a Japanese model maker who makes little cottages and shacks in the woods.
I added few npu like the speargun as light holder, pistons on the electricity pole, Ninjago hat on the chimney and some other even on the tow truck.
I tried to photograph the scene making it alive and warm, it seems to me there is a nice atmosphere due to the light sideways.

Below few snapshots while I was building the cottage during the lockdown and the usual sketch of the build.

“FIRE TRUCK” designer Chuck Miller talks about his works and his career [Special interview for Norton74]

“FIRE TRUCK” designer Chuck Miller talks about his works and his career [Special interview for Norton74]

From the beginning I set myself the goal of bringing original and interesting content, high-level MOCs and top notch photos to my fans. Everything written, built and photographed by myself.
That’s why today I submit you an exclusive interview with an american car designer father of the Fire Truck, the radical Show Rod I built few years ago via LEGO bricks.
His name is Chuck Miller and his nephew, Eric Miller, is a LEGO fan and he follows my FB page. When Eric spotted the brick-built Fire Truck he got in touch with me and he showed the model to his uncle who was really impressed. I was honoured for that and I had the chance to make few questions to Mr. Miller about his career and his famous vehicles.
Miller founded Styline Customs in Detroit in the late 1960s, specialized in building custom and concept cars designed to attract attention and win awards. One of his major successes came at the 1968 Detroit Autorama, where he won the prestigious Ridler Award with the “Fire Truck”. 

You can read the full interview below: ladies and gentlemen starts your engine!

Hi Mr. Chuck Miller and thanks for accepting to have a chat with me. Just few questions about you and your creations.

N74: When your interest in cars and Show Rods started and why?
CM: It started when I was 10 or 11. I would draw in my school books while in class. When I was in high school I was a hall monitor and would sit and draw in a note book the whole time.

N74: Can you tell me a little bit about your background? I mean, are you a self-made car designer or did you study design or something like that?
CM: I have no formal designer education. I bought the body shop I worked at through high school when I was 20 years old. So my education started at an early age. Here the kind of schooling I have is called the “school of hard knocks”.

N74: In a few words, if possible, tell me which are your career milestones.
CM: One of my biggest mile stones were winning the Don Ridler memorial award for the Fire Truck in 1968. There are many more but this is the biggest.

N74: As you know I built the replica of your famous Fire Truck; can you tell me where the inspiration to build it come from and when?
CM: The idea was one that I have had for some time. In 1966 I started working with John Bogosian making some drawings. We would go back and forth with ideas and drawings until I made the final decision.

N74: Did it satisfy your expectations? Did it win any awards? Any curiosities about the Fire Truck?
CM: As with all projects there are always little things you wish you would have done differently. But I was very satisfied with the final outcome. The biggest award was the “Ridler” but there were many others. The curiosities are the fire extinguisher is the gas tank, the first aid kit is the battery cover, and my favorite is the top of the gear shifter is a handle from Miller Beer tap.

N74: Which are your favourite creations?
CM: This is like trying to pick your favorite child…

N74: Have you been influenced by other car designer? If yes, which ones?
CM: I paid close attention to many other builders such as George Barris, the Alexander brothers, Bill Hines, Gene Winfield, and Darryl Starbird.

N74: Are you working on something new or are you just enjoyng your time?
CM: Last year I made a clone of my 1969 Red Baron hot rod that Tom Daniel designed. This year I am working on remaking the set of Zingers I built in the 70’s. Now I work on something when and if I like.

N74: Recently I built the “Paddy Wagon” designed by Tom Daniel. The Fire Truck and the Paddy Wagon look having the same source of inspiration. Is this correct? Have you ever known Tom Daniel?
CM: I did not know Tom Daniel when I was working out the design. I have meet Tom one time in California in 1969 after I built the Red Baron.

Many thanks for your time Mr Chuck Miller, it has been an honour chatting with you and I’m sure LEGO fans will appreciate the interview.
Keep up the good work!

More info about Chuck MIller’s works: chuckmillerstyline.com