Magda’s Garden Shed: behind the scenes of the building process

Magda’s Garden Shed: behind the scenes of the building process

Let’s take a look at some unreleased WIP snapshots of my latest creation straight from the countryside. Follow Magda’s Garden Shed “step by step” building stages, scroll through the images and find out the secrets of my latest flowering diorama.
In the middle of the scene is the actual garden shed which has the classic American barn shape (does it remind you of anything?) and a warm color combination: reddish brown for the roof and eaves, combined with the tan of the walls and the dark tan of the doors. The entrance steps are medium nougat.
The large tree that sprouts up from the roof immediately catches the eye, and it’s the leading feature of the entire scene. The outdoor flooring is made with many light bluish gray slopes of different sizes, among which I have inserted white tiles to give the idea of porphyry. The effect is very pleasant.
All around there are many plants, flowers, and a couple of saplings (one on the left in the foreground and the yellow one in the background). On the right, you can spot the scarecrow made with different types of bars and with the head and hat of the collectible Scarecrow Minifigure, one of my favorites.
The Swirling Rocks element on the left, coming from the Sandman Minifigure, is used as a vase holder, I think it’s a NPU (Nice Part Usage). A flower holder made with a fishnet hangs from the side wall, and close to it is a plant set in a Scala and Belville series Flowerpot. I have already used that element in my Winter Garden.
There are also two wheelbarrows in the scene: a red one leaning against the wall near the pumpkins, and another in the foreground on the right. The latter is made with different LEGO pieces. Can you guess which ones they are?
On the top of the façade there is a porthole made like the ones in my previous Blue Cottage. On the left, you can see a compass that represents a sort of sundial. There is also a nice little roof over the door made with many slightly raised 2X1 tiles.

Below the step by step pictures, in order:
1) The flowering diorama and me;
2) A beautiful photo of the shed with a natural background;
3) Preparing the base made with many dark tan plates and plate wedges, the flooring is made with many light bluish gray slopes of different sizes, among which I have inserted white tiles to give the idea of ​​porphyry;
4) The facade is ready, only a bunch of details are missing;
5) Coupling the base and the main building;
6) Adding the details on the left side;
7) Plants and utensils added on the right side and the eaves made with many slightly raised 2X1 tiles;
8) The two-piece roof is made with reddish brown plates and tiles;
9) With the roof on top the shed is almost complete;
10) The Garden Shed is complete and ready for the photo shoot!

The inspiration behind the Garden Shed came from a drawing by a Japanese dioramist, Mr. Yasuhiro Okugawa, who I really appreciate. Take a look below at the coloring process of the original black&white drawing.

A-frame Cabin reaches 10K supporters on LEGO Ideas!

A-frame Cabin reaches 10K supporters on LEGO Ideas!

A few hours ago my A-FrAme Cabin achieved the coveted 10,000 votes on LEGO IDEAS platform: it’s unbelievable!
I’ve worked hard these 42 days to promote the project and I am delighted to have achieved the goal.
I published several updates in that period and this helped the project to keep cool and appealing.
The most important updates were at 6,000 votes (interior update) and at 8,000 votes (Spiders attack), below you can find out the photos.
I thank everyone who helped me in this incredible adventure. I don’t know how it will end up but I am already very happy and satisfied with it.
Thank you all, you’re awesome! And now fingers crossed…

2020: A YEAR IN REVIEW

2020: A YEAR IN REVIEW

As usual it’s time to look back and take stock of what has been done in the past twelve months. 2020 has finally passed and what a strange year it’s been for everyone.
Despite many personal issues I have had to face, I have built many creations I am particularly satisfied with: new colors, new shapes, new techniques, new stories, I must admit I built some of my favorite MOCs ever.
I had a lot of fun testing new part usages and also find out new piece on Bricklink. I used a lot of weird parts in my last few MOCs. Very funny!
2020 also marks an incredible goal to me: I reached 10.000 followers both on Instagram and Facebook, really unbelievable.
Thanks to all of you who follow me and support my work, it means a lot to me! Thanks to all the great builders out there who are a big source of inspiration. Also a big thank you to all the blogs and magazines that featured my works in 2020. Let’s take a look at 2020 builds here below.
All the best and happy building!

The snowy Magic Bus is The Brothers Brick cover photo for December 2020!

The snowy Magic Bus is The Brothers Brick cover photo for December 2020!

Few hours ago I had the pleasure to find out my snowy Magic Bus has been chosen by The Brothers Brick as the December photo cover for all Brothers Brick social media. A huge pleasure and honor for me, thanks once again TBB team!
The same happens 5 years ago when my Scooter Garage was chosen as the TBB cover photo for August 2015, few months ago when the yellow General Store was the Cover Photo for June 2020 and last month when the A-frame cabin, probably one of my most appreciated creations, was chosen once again as the TBB cover, this time for November. Three times in the same year, unbelievable but mind blowing!
Take a look at the four screenshot straight from The Brothers Brick website and read below the complete write-up by James Wiley (TBB Social Media Specialist).

“This month’s cover photo from Andrea Lattanzio takes us back to the wild. The Magic Bus we’ve been treated with before has now been treated with snow, which makes for a lovely winter scene. The bus remains familiar, but there have been some added details to give depth and texture to the snow. Additionally, trees that were once leaf-filled are now barren and covered with snow, the firs have been replaced with white branches, and the clever touch of icicles added to the bus windows complete the scene.
Be sure to visit Norton74’s flickr page for a bit of history on this bus that no longer resides in Alaska’s wilderness. It’s an interesting story that makes for a great scene.“

(“TBB Cover Photo for December 2020: Into the Wintery Wild” The Brothers Brick – December 12, 2020)

Stilt Houses building process

Stilt Houses building process

Let’s take a deep look at the building process of the bizarre Stilt Houses. Don’t miss the tons of NPUs (New Part Usage) and techniques I used, especially check out the weird pieces you can spot here and there. Have fun!
In order:
1) Building the first and tallest framework;
2) Preparing the 1st platform;
3) Adding the tan walls;
4) Completing the tiny house with the roof;
5) Assembling the framework with the 1st platform;
6) The 2nd framework is ready;
7) Platform No.2 ready;
8) Framework No.2 coupled with its platform;
9) The two structures are linked by a crumbling bridge;
10) A bunch of details to complete the diorama;
11) The brand new diorama is complete and ready for the photo shoot;
12) Click! Stilt Houses photo shoot!

Snowy Magic Bus: behind the scenes of the building process

Snowy Magic Bus: behind the scenes of the building process

Let’s take a look at some unreleased WIP snapshots of my latest creation straight from Alaska: the Magic Bus in the snow from Sean Penn 2007 “Into the Wild” movie. Follow the Snowy Magic Bus diorama step by step building stages, scroll through the images and find out the secrets of one of my beloved creations:
1) Building the base using plates and wedges;
2) Placing the bus, testing sizes and proportions;
3) Snowy pines complete the base;
4) Adding slopes and tiles on the roof as snow effect;
5) Ready for the photo shoot;
6) A sketch as starting point;
7) The real Bus in the Alaskan snow.
Enjoy!